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PostSubject: Parent ifon.   Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:55 pm

For parents skeptical about paintball, enjoy...


Because paintball itself may be misunderstood by someone who knows nothing about the sport or because the only press paintball receives in mass media seems to be bad press. Getting your parents to let you play paintball may not be that easy and getting them to actually buy you paintball gear may be even actually harder. You shouldn’t hold it against your parents if they’re apprehensive about your interest in paintball, as an outsider to paintball there is a lot they probably aren’t aware of. Informing your parents and answering all their potential questions should be the first part in your initial negotiations. Yes, I called it negotiations, since they can provide something you want you also will most likely have to give something back of equal value to them.
1. Your safety, the safety of those around you and the potential risk of injury to all persons involved will undoubtedly be the primary concern of every parent. Although all paintball gear seems to come with the same set of standard warnings there is no system of legal punishment for disobeying common sense, unlike seatbelt laws where you can be fined for not buckling up.
Parents should know : If you are playing on a legitimate field where you are required to pay field fees, you will be policed and require to follow quite a few safety rules. The only injuries you will come home with are the welts left from the paintballs themselves as paintball is statistically one of the safest sports around.
2. General hooliganism. Are you going to go around making youtube videos of yourself shooting your dumb friend who volunteered to be the guinea pig? Are you going to run rampant around the neighbourhood shooting road signs, cars and other peoples houses at random? I think here you will have the greatest time convincing them, as you might very well be a little jerk who shouldn’t be playing paintball. But this is where compromise in your negotiations can be played up.
Parents should know : There is something you may or may not have heard of, its called the fire triangle. Imagine a triangle; on one side you have oxygen, on another side you have fuel and on the last side you have the source of ignition. Creating fire is impossible if you take away one of these three elements. Now imagine the paintball triangle; on one side you have the paintball marker, on another side you have paintballs and on the last side you have the markers propellant source. Playing paintball and causing damage through hooliganism isn’t possible if you take away one of the three elements needed to play paintball. If you lock up the marker in a safe place, as you would a real firearm when its not in use, you eliminate any chance of wrong doing on your child’s part.
3. Paintball is expensive. There is no argument on that one, paintball can be expensive. If you don’t already, putting in extra chore time around the house will be required. Pushing a lawn mower around for a couple hours a week or doing more dishes is really a fair trade off to be able to play paintball regularly though. If your parents are going to buy your gear for you initially don’t make a rushed decision. Buy something practical that will require the least amount of upgrading and maintenance. Tippmann 98’s, BT4’s and a few of the lower end Smart Parts markers may suit you well and be more gentle on your parents pockets.
Parents should know : There are always deals to be had, and when shopping in a retail paintball store don’t be afraid to haggle or ask for a deal when making a large purchase. If you are going to buy an entire setup for your child ( marker, mask, c02 tank, pod pack, pods ) simply suggesting “Hey, since I’m buying all this you can cut me a deal right” there’s a very high chance you can get something, anything, taken off the bottom line. Shop around, look online, there’s no rush. When taking your child to a local field often you’ll find they have membership packages with an array of benefits, again lowering your overall costs. An average day at an expensive field can run up to $90, which is really a high estimate, anything you can do to lower the initial and overall costs will bring harmony to the balance of you wanting your child to have fun and your child getting what they want.
Kids, paintball is fun, you know this. If concessions are required in order for you to be allowed to play or if your parents are going to buy your gear for you, you have to be willing to make sacrifices.
Parents, your child’s interest in paintball shouldn’t frighten or alarm you, they aren’t recruited militants. You should really give this a try yourself, you might surprised and also get hooked. If you have any other questions or concerns, or you’d like guidance in making a purchase for your child, feel free to email me chris@chrisschneck.com I’m not sei know how you are feeling dude. 4 years ago both my mom and dad felt the same way. i have many friends whose parents feel the same way.

------------------------------------------------------

This sport is not about intentionally causing pain to each other is about teamwork, cooperation, and strategy. its like playing a slightly painful version of chess except any one can do it.

Paintball is statistically the safest sport out there right now so if you follow all the safety procedures you cant get hurt. as for the dislike of guns well that's not really what there called. most stores called them 'markers' because all they do is mark people with paint.

lastly dude respect your parents. there just looking out for you because they are concerned for you safety. take them to a paintball store and have an employee there explain to them what you're getting yourself into.lling anything nor am I a commissioned sales person.


Sports Injuries Report
US SPORT Yearly injuries per 1000 Participants
Boxing 5.2
Football-Tackle 3.8
Snowboarding 3.8
Ice Hockey 3.7
Snow Skiing 3.0
Soccer 2.4
Softball 2.2
Basketball 1.9
Football-Touch 1.9
Surfing 1.8
Cheerleading 1.7
Water Skiing 1.6
Racquetball 1.5
Martial Arts 1.5
Wresting 1.4
Baseball 1.4
Volleyball 1.3
Mountain Biking 1.2
Tennis 1.1
Ice Skating 1.1
Horseback Riding 1.0
Skateboarding 0.8
Hunting 0.8
Bicycling-BMX 0.8
Running 0.6
Paintball 0.2

SOURCE: AMERICAN SPORTS DATE, INC.





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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:56 pm




WHY PAINTBALL ISN'T ANYTHING
LIKE WAR
An Analytical Comparison
INTRODUCTION
Paintball, on the outside, may look like the personification of war. I can see
why people would call paintball "war games". We wear camouflage, we carry
"guns" and we "shoot" each other. Pretty warlike, isn't it? Not really.
NO ONE GETS HURT
When you play paintball, you go home at the end of the day. You are a little
tired and bruised, but none the worse for wear. This is not so in war. People die
in war. They get shot, and they don't get back up again, ever. How many
cemeteries are dedicated to paintball casualties? How many are dedicated to
those who died in the service of our country?
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS "TOTAL PAINTBALL"
We don't bomb cities. We don't try to destroy the factories that make our
opponent's equipment. We do not devastate the opponent's home nor do we hurt
their family. The concept of total war does just that. Few wars, since the
American Civil War, have not affected the lives of innocent civilians -- whose
only crime was to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.
PAINTBALL IS NOT ABOUT GREED, OR POWER, OR PRINCIPLE
Wars start because someone has a grudge to settle, or they want what another
country has, or they want THEIR views to be held by the rest of the world. No
one started to play paintball to subjugate or destroy another person.
PAINTBALL DOES NOT BRING OUT THE WORST IN PEOPLE
Need I list all the atrocities in the wars in the last 100 years? Warfare seems to
bring out the worst in individuals, units and leaders. People do things in war
that they would not even contemplate in peace time. Yes, some players cheat.
The greater majority of players behave themselves and act in a dignified matter
and treat each other with respect.
PAINTBALL DOES NOT DESTROY ANYTHING
When was the last time you heard of a paintball game destroying a bridge, a
building or a city? War is wasteful. It is destruction on the most horrifying
scale. Paintball is fun!
PAINTBALL DOES NOT EMOTIONALLY SCAR PEOPLE FOR LIFE
Every man and woman who has experienced the horror and chaos of modern
combat still carries emotional and psychological scars for the rest of their lives.
Second World War veterans STILL cry when they think about the friends they
have lost and the destruction they saw. The war ended over sixty years ago and
these people have got on with their lives. However, you never, EVER, get over
it.
CONCLUSION
I'm not saying that war is right or wrong, what I am saying is that it is mayhem,
death and destruction on the highest level imaginable. It is unadulterated
carnage, pure and simple. Young men and women lay down their lives and
leave grieving families behind to try and cope with the loss. Paintball is nothing
like that. If anyone tells you otherwise, they are fools.
Just remember, the trappings of war ("guns", cammies and "shooting") do not
make paintball a manifestation of war. As Napoleon has said, "C'est
magnifique, mais c'est ne pas la guerre." (It's magnificent, but it's not war.)



Parents View on Paintball
Mom, dad, parent, guardian, paintball is a sport where players carry guns and shoot each other. I am not going to beat around the bush about it. Naturally, you do not want your loved one involved in this. I would not blame you. But let me tell you some facts about paintball that you may not know. You may be suprised that paintball teaches some important life skills.
Safety is very important since projectiles are used to mark players. This is regulated by the ASTM International and dictates safety requirements for fields, playing equipment and safety equipment. Players must use goggles and is strictly enforced by the field staff on regulated fields. Many fields require one to two on-gun safety devices to work. That being a trigger lock (called a safety) and/or a barrel plug to stop paintballs from exiting the barrel incase of an accidental discharge.
Not only that, because of the enforcement of safety, respect is learned. For both the guns they use to fellow players. Offending players of such safety rules will more than likely be kicked out of the game. Keeping with unsafe practice will be cause for being banned from the field. This also helps in obeying authority. Argue with the field staff and you won't get to play. Responsibility for their own actions is learned. There are rules in paintball. Whether it is field, safety, or the game rules, if you don't follow them, you will be told and probably will not be able to play. In paintball, cheaters are not welcome.
Paintball helps build character. As the individual, it encourages problem solving and decision making. I have yet to play a game that is the same situation. Always different circumstances. Situations arise that needs to be solved so that it is in their (and the teams) favor. Try something really dumb and fail. The only thing hurt may be your pride. Paintball is full of calculated risks. You're always trying to think ahead. "If that team goes that way, this is what will happen. But if I go there, I could keep them from achieving that" can be a common thought process. Being responsible for ones actions and weighing the pros and cons is always foremost in a typical game.
The individual effort is built. It is not easy being the only person on your team against some 4 or 5 on the opposing team. But sometimes, that may be the situation even if it is not the fault of others or yourself. I have found myself in this situation many times. Applying oneself without the help of others is very positive. In life, you're not always going to have others to rely upon. This builds confidence in you.
Working with others on a one-on-one or team basis is also learned. Many individuals will only rely on oneself at the very start of the game. In paintball, relying on yourself will get you tagged out faster. Working on a team level to achieve a goal is very rewarding. Who knows, their being in a position on the field may be of great help to the team. Also, working one-on-one is also built upon. This one-on-one relationship is not only on the field, but also off. Having problems with a marker will need assistance from the more experienced players. We all do not act the same. Therefore, the interaction with different people will help the individual.
Teaching ones limitations. As teens, they know everything. Paintball shows the individual their limitations. Forces them to work within that. Only so much air and paint can be carried at one time while being light on your feet.
Unlike videogames teaching hand-eye coordination, paintball offers that with the addition of interaction of other people of many ages and getting excercise. When experience is gained, leadership skills are gained. Coordinating efforts and getting the "team" to work as one is not easy. They need to evaluate the individuals abilities and use it to the teams advantage.
Last, through hard work, goals will be achieved. A very rewarding accomplishment. Through teamwork, knowing oneself limitations, and individual effort, achieving tasks is a great feeling. Then there is the other side of the coin and learning to accept losses. Even with hard work and doing everything right will not always gain a win in the game. With that, it encourages thinking of doing something else to increase the chances of a win in the next game.
Let me also add that on fields, there is always adult supervision. No alcohol or drugs are allowed on their premises. You need a clear mind to play. If you're high or intoxicated, you will end up hurting yourself. Unsafe practices can and will be grounds for dismissal from the field. There are no "Non-Smoking" fields. So you will need to instill the wrongs in that
I have seen positive results and relationships strengthened by the participation of you, the parent. You would not be the only parent/child to walk on to a field to play. I have seen many do this. Many of the field staff and the players like seeing this and think that it is so cool for dad and junior to play. Think of it this way, your taking an interest in what your child likes. A definite plus from your child's standpoint. If you're not up to the task of actually playing, maybe stand there on the sidelines and watch the action. Or help out there at the staging area.
That is the hidden aspect of playing paintball that can teach your lifes lessons in a fun environment. To see what is involved in the sport and what to expect in a game, read through my one articles on that subject. Particularly the "What to Expect" section. Also, paintball is one of the safer sports that is open to young and old. Insurance companies and medical companies have shown how safe paintball is as compared to other sports that are seemingly innocent. Look over some of the statistics.
As guardians of our children, we try our best to protect them from harm. Yet, this is almost impossible in many situations. Learning is usually trial and error. Life in general is not fair to us adults. We all at one time or another have wished we could start over. Paintball offers the motivation to try and change a loosing streak. There is always another game to improve oneself.

Parents
Many parents are apprehensive when their son or daughter begins to show an interest in paintball. However, the sport of paintball offers some excellent opportunities for parents to be involved with their kids and teach valuable life lessons. A marker must be carefully cleaned and maintained which teaches responsibility. Strict rules can be established that state that the marker can only be used for playing paintball. Any misuse should result in a suspension of privileges. Paintball can become expensive. A younger person can learn how to save their money or work chores to earn extra cash.
Many parents find playing paintball to be a fun way to spend time with their teen. Since paintball is more about stealth and wits than strength or size, adults and young people are evenly matched. If a parent doesn't want to play, he can ref. It can be difficult to find someone willing to referee an outlaw paintball game so a parent's involvement will be welcome. As a referee, the parent can check to see that everyone is playing safely. Remember that every referee must also wear a paintball mask.
There is no evidence that playing paintball leads to violent tendencies or delinquent behavior. If anything, meaningful activities and hobbies help keep kids busy and out of trouble. If a young person enjoys playing, he or she may want to consider joining a team. Playing on a team requires diligence and hard work. Like any team sport, paintball teaches how to succeed by working together. Paintball also provides a form of exercise. Obesity is a rapidly growing problem in the United States because of our increasingly sedentary life style and active sports can be part of the solution.
Every parent should feel free to set reasonable limits or ground rules for a child who wants to play paintball. However, a parent does not need to feel threatened by this interest. With proper guidance and some involvement, parents will find that playing paintball is a terrific activity that provides quality interaction and positive values

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:00 am

interaction and positive values.

A Parent's Paintball Primer
By Bill Mills - Dec 2004
Around the holidays parents are often presented with something on wish lists that they didn’t see in their youth, paintball gear. With this rapidly growing sport, this brings to mind questions like, whether paintball is safe, and whether it can be played in the backyard or out on the street. Unfortunately, it can be all too easy for a parent to buy a package of paintball gear at a large chain “mart” store or sporting goods store and simply assume that it poses no serious dangers because it was available on the shelves of a mass merchant. The parent sending their child out into the yard to play paintball on Christmas day could be making a life changing mistake. On the other hand, the parent who takes the time to read and follow the safety instructions included with their paintball equipment, learn about its safe and proper use, and makes sure that their child plays in a supervised playing environment that meets the requirements laid out in those instructions can be fostering the start of a life long sport for their child.
The term paintball can be applied to any number of games that center on the use of a paintgun. The most typical of these games is capture the flag, where two teams of players compete to grab a flag either from the center of the field or from their opponents side of the field, and return it to a base station. Along the way, any player that is hit by a paintball that breaks open on them is eliminated from play. There are many other game variations, such as elimination where the aim is simply to shoot out all of the members of the opposing team, or attack and defend, where one team must defend a fortified position. The commonality of all of these paintball games is that they involve a paintgun, often called a marker to shoot the paintball. The paintball gun is a large bore (.68 inches) gas powered device, which is built for one purpose – to launch paintballs at paintball players.
SAFETY IS KEY
The sport of paintball has an excellent track record in terms of safety, but that record can only be maintained when key protective elements are rigorously enforced in the game. For a player or parent of a paintball player, it is critical to learn about and understand these aspects. Some of paintball’s most common injuries are the same as most any outdoor activity – sprained ankles, knees, minor cuts and scrapes, and other distresses that come from tripping and falling when running around out of doors. Proper footwear, like high-topped athletic shoes or boots gives added protection for the ankle, while knee padding can even be used for players who slide and crawl more aggressively.
GOGGLES
The truly frightening injury associated with paintball is an eye injury. Paintballs can travel over 200 miles per hour when exiting the barrel of a paintball gun. While a paintball is only a marble sized blob of non-toxic water based paint surrounded by a thin shell of the same type of gelatin used in bath oil beads, it can literally destroy the unprotected human eye at the speeds which it travels. A number of recent articles in medical journals have noticed an increase in paintball related eye injuries caused by paintball over recent years. Also noted in many of these studies is the fact that the overwhelming majority of these injuries happened when proper paintball goggles were not used.
Paintball goggles are the front line of defense for the eyes. In the mid 1980s when paintball was still a very new and evolving sport, simple shop goggles were used for eye protection. Unfortunately, these proved to provide less than adequate protection, despite the fact that one of the leading distributors of paintball supplies included them in player packages with their paintball marker. Cases of paintballs breaking through the lenses of these goggles, or ski or moto-cross goggles were not uncommon. By the late 1980s JT USA developed the first of the modern paintball goggles, built to handle the full force of multiple paintball impacts with a rugged polycarbonate lens. The paintball goggle soon evolved to also include protection for the ears, the temples and the face down to the chin. While many seasoned paintball players do not realize this, the mask portion of the goggle is also critical to protecting the eyes - it is not a removable option. In addition to protecting the portions of the head they cover, paintball masks are designed to prevent a paintball from striking around the edge of the goggle frame and getting to the eye by bypassing the lens assembly.
When shopping for paintball goggles, the first and most prominent thing to look for is that the manufacturer warrants the goggles to meet or exceed ASTM standard F1776. ASTM International was originally founded as the American Society for Testing and Materials. Its original purpose was to set standards used for grading iron for use in railroad rails. It has since expanded to a world-wide voluntary standards management organization. The ASTM paintball subcommittee consists of representatives from the paintball industry, and has even involved concerned medical professionals. This group has published a number of voluntary standards for the sport of paintball. ASTM does not test or approve paintball products, but it has published a group of tests in ASTM F1776 that the paintball industry has adopted as strength and testing criteria for paintball goggles.
The next most important thing to look for in a paintball goggle, is fit. This is one reason that paintball goggles aren’t a good gift for under the Christmas tree. A poor fitting goggle can leave unprotected gaps around the face, and worse yet, slip off during a game. For this reason, it is a wise decision to shop for paintball goggles at a paintball store which has a variety of brands and models available. Also of importance is that the goggles be of a design that resists fogging. A significant number of paintball eye injuries that happened to players who had proper goggles were not due to the goggle failing, but rather to the player removing them on the playing field, usually due to the lens fogging. Some paintball goggles minimize lens fogging by using a large curved lens giving more airspace between the lens and face. Others use dual lens designs with an inner lens that is insulated by a trapped layer of gas. This is another area where fit comes into play. Gaps between the goggle and the nose bridge can bring warm moist air up behind the lens. For players with glasses, some goggles are equipped with compact fans that circulate air behind the lens to combat fogging of both the goggle and glasses. The staff at a paintball shop will be able to check the fit of the goggle, as well as advise on how well the different models resist fogging.
Paintball goggles typically range from $20 to $100 or so, and especially in terms of fit and comfort (which ultimately affect protection) tend to be a “you get what you pay for” type of product. While it may be tempting for a parent budgeting Christmas gift money to save where possible, especially if the bulk of that budget is going toward a flashy, feature laden paintball marker, it is important to remember that the goggles are arguably the most important safety item in paintball. They are what stand between your child and permanent blindness. As I often say, a good pair of paintball goggles that fits properly is a whole lot less expensive than a glass eye.
BARREL BLOCKING DEVICES
Another important piece of safety equipment in a player’s gear bag is a barrel blocking device or BBD. The old adage from firearms safety can also be applied to paintball – “most accidents happen with an ‘unloaded’ gun.” Rather than trying to load and unload a paintgun as a player walks on and off the playing field, a barrel blocking device serves as an easy visual indicator of the safety status of a marker. Their purpose is to block the barrel in case the paintgun is accidentally fired when it is off the playing field, in an area where people are not wearing paintball goggles. In the late 1980s SC Village in Southern California was the first paintball field to require the use of barrel plugs. Barrel plugs, made of metal or plastic are basically like a cork for the barrel of the paintball gun. Often a shot will dislodge the barrel plug, and spray paint spatter making quite a mess, but the plug will usually serve its purpose (as long as it was a proper fit to the paintgun) and prevent an intact paintball from leaving the barrel at full speed.
As paintgun technology has progressed so have barrel blocking devices. With modern semi-automatic paintball markers, especially those that have sensitive electronic triggers, there is a chance of multiple accidental shots, so if the first shot dislodged a barrel plug, those around the marker would be unprotected from the second shot. The solution came in the form of what is typically called a barrel sock or barrel bag. This cloth bag slides over the end of the barrel and is held on to the marker by a loop of cord or webbing that loops over a knob, hopper, or other part toward the back of the paintgun’s body. A properly built and secured barrel sock will catch multiple paintballs without coming loose from the barrel. While many paintball gun manufacturers still include barrel plugs rather than the newer sock style barrel blocking devices, most paintball fields and all major paintball tournaments require the newer safety devices.
CHRONOGRAPHS
Most modern paintball guns feature some form of velocity adjustment. How velocity is adjusted varies with each particular model, and these settings are explained in the owner’s manual. Because the weight of paintballs and their shape is relatively consistent, the key component that affects how far a paintball will fly is muzzle velocity, or more simply put, how fast the paintball is traveling when it leaves the marker. It can be tempting for players who don’t understand paintball safety to want to increase their velocity. They do this to have more range, and thus an advantage over their competitors. The problem with this idea, as that as the velocity increases, so does the impact energy.
Leaders in the paintball industry have determined that 300 feet per second, or approximately 204 miles per hour is the maximum acceptable velocity for a paintball. Bruising at the site of a paintball hit on unprotected skin is a common occurrence in paintball. However, at higher velocities more serious bruising and tissue damage can occur. Above 300 feet per second, there is a also a risk of transdermal injection, where the paintball can hit bare skin so hard that it can push some of itself, and bacteria from the skin and paintball through pores and under the skin, leading to infection. Additionally, paintball goggles are designed to protect against paintballs traveling at speeds up to 300 feet per second (realistically the ASTM standards involve testing them to far beyond this point to allow a significant margin of error, and overprotection, however, they are designed for use only with paintguns firing at or under 300 fps.) For these reasons, paintball fields and the companies that insure them typically require that markers be adjusted to fire at or below 285 feet per second. This allows a margin of error in velocity and prevent shots over 300 fps on the field.
To measure velocity, a paintgun is fired over a chronograph. Using either a pair of optical sensors, or Doppler RADAR technology, the chronograph displays a velocity reading in feet per second. Because the velocity at which the paintgun is fired will be affected by a variety of factors, including temperature, propellant gas temperature, and even the brand and freshness of the paint used, it is imperative that the velocity of the paintgun be checked multiple times through out a day’s play. It is not practical to “set and forget” a paintgun’s velocity. Because of this, a chronograph is a required piece of paintball safety equipment. With costs ranging from $80 to over $200, most players do not own their own chronograph, relying instead on the field chronographs at the commercial field where they play, or pooling money with team-mates for a group owned chronograph.

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:00 am

CO2 AND COMPRESSED AIR
Handling CO2 or compressed air is another area of safety concern. The CO2 tanks used in paintball store carbon dioxide as a liquid that boils to create gas in the tank as it is consumed. The pressure of CO2 depends largely on temperature, and generally ranges from 800 to 1200 psi. Compressed air is the other gas source used in the sport, and compressed air tanks have built in regulators which reduce the pressure of gas fed to the paintball gun. Compressed air systems range in pressure ratings from 3,000 to 5,000psi. Handling compressed gases can be done safely, but should not be taken for granted. It is critical to read and follow all of the manufacturer's instructions regarding usage and storage of pressure tanks. As CO2 is especially sensitive to temperature shifts, CO2 tanks should not be stored in direct sunlight, or enclosed warm spaces like the dashboard of a car in the sun.
If a CO2 tank does overheat, it is designed to rupture its burst disk, a safety pressure relief valve. This will result in a spray of CO2 vapor, and the tank may spin around a bit. If this happens, the best thing to do is get away from it and wait for it to empty. The valve can then be repaired by an airsmith at a paintball shop, where the burst disk can be replaced with a new unified burst disk set to the proper torque. Similarly, if a burst disk ruptures, or a component leaks on a compressed air system, the best thing to do is get away from it, and wait until it has drained before taking it to a professional for inspection. A thin jet of high pressure compressed air from a broken gauge can inflict serious injury by injecting air under the skin of any body part held next to it. The mantra for parents to teach their younger players about compressed gas tanks is that, if it’s leaking, get away from it and get help.
Many of the CO2, and all of the compressed air (often erroneously referred to as nitrogen or nitro due to their compatibility with nitrogen gas) tanks used in paintball have a limited life span. At cycles ranging from 3 to 5 years, the tanks must be tested and re-certified by a department of transportation approved hydrostatic testing facility. For CO2 tanks, the cost of testing usually comes close to or even exceeds the cost of a new tank, leaving many to simply consider the tanks to be disposable at the end of their cycle. For compressed air tanks, the higher cost of the tank can make testing and certification cost effective. The life span of a tank can be checked by comparing its date of manufacture and DOT hazmat exemption code number, both of which are stamped on the tank, to the information available at hazmat.dot.gov.
In addition to the legally required inspection, it is wise to regularly perform visual inspections of tanks, to make certain they are not leaking, chipped, damaged, or showing other signs of physical wear. The tank’s valve or regulator should also be checked to make certain it is not loose in the tank. CO2 tank valves are not considered to be user serviceable, and should never be removed or installed by anyone but a professional trained in maintaining high pressure compressed gas equipment. At the time of this writing two deaths are known to have occurred relatively recently, due to partially full CO2 tanks accidentally being unscrewed from their valves. These are the only two deaths known to have been caused directly by a paintball gun or paintball compressed gas tank. At least one of these accidents was suspected upon preliminary investigation to be due at least in part to modification of the tank’s valve by an untrained person. More information on the CO2 tank valve issues, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s related warning can be found HERE.
As with any piece of paintball equipment, if you are ever in doubt about how to properly handle, check, service or repair a compressed gas tank, get in touch with the manufacturer or distributor of the product. A few minutes researching on the Internet for a phone number and talking on the phone can be the difference between a safe enjoyable experience and an accident waiting to happen.
THE PLAYING AREA
Arguably the most difficult point to safe paintball play is finding a safe and legal location. When that brand new paintball gun comes out of the wrapping paper under the Christmas tree, it can be very tempting to take it out in the back yard and try it out. Safety aside, that may not be legal. In many cities there are ordinances prohibiting or heavily restricting the use of airguns. In Palm Bay, Florida, for example, the city’s code against discharging a firearm includes a clause stating that its definition of firearm includes not only firearms but also airguns, though it provides an exception whereby paintball guns may be used at a municipal paintball field. Violation of this law can result in a fine of up to $500 and up to 90 days in jail. Most of the sales staff at the large chain stores don’t bother to mention that when selling paintball starter kits.
In addition to being in a place where paintball is legal, and on land where the land-owner has given permission there are a number of other safety issues to consider. A paintball playing field needs to have a buffer of at least 300 feet between areas where the paintguns will be fired, and any persons, pets or property that are unprotected (i.e. not wearing paintball goggles.) Optionally, 20 foot tall paintball netting can be erected to form a boundary between playing fields and “safe zones.” The area also should be free from items that will be trip and fall hazards to running players who have focused their concentration on the paintballs flying through the air.
For minors playing, adult supervision is mandatory. Barrel blocking devices, goggles and chronographs only work when they are used. Younger, and often adult players for that matter, need to be watched over to make sure that goggles aren’t removed on the playing field, that decisions aren’t made to increase the velocity to unsafe levels to get that extra bit of range, etc. A full description of the components that make up safe paintball field operation can be found in the ASTM standard F1777-97.
Setting up and maintaining a safe, legal paintball playing area is not a quick and simple process. As an alternative, many players go instead to a commercially operated field. Commercially operated fields offer a number of advantages. Legal issues will have already been taken care of through zoning variances. Paintball barrier netting, or boundaries will be in place to segregate the fields from the staging areas, chronographs will be in use, and field staff will be supervising games. Commercially operated fields also offer other bonuses to the player, in that there will be a group of people to play against, and often improvements to the field, like inflatable bunkers on tournament style fields, forts and bunkers on scenario fields and other attractions. Often there will be an airsmith on site to help with any equipment problems, and commercial fields also supply rental equipment, which means other family members can come along to try out the game without investing first in gear.
Unfortunately, like most businesses not all paintball fields are well run. Spending some time asking local players, and even an advance trip to check out a field are a great way to pick the winners from the losers.
PAINTBALL GUNS ARE FOR THE GAME
It almost seems so obvious that it shouldn’t need stating, unfortunately it does. Just like most sporting goods equipment – baseball bats, hockey sticks, and golf clubs, paintball guns have been misused to cause serious injuries to innocent victims. As paintball equipment is more common in US homes, assaults and drive by shootings with paintballs have made the news more frequently. As a parent, no one is in a better position than you to decide when your child is mature enough to own a paintball gun. Some parents opt to keep their minor children’s paintball guns in a locked closet or other secure location when not in use. Not only does this stand as a protection from misuse, but it also provides the young player a buffer against accusations if paintball vandalisms or assaults happen in their neighborhood.

THANK YOU
As a paintball player since 1986, and someone who has worked with youth through Scouting and church groups even longer, I would like to say that I am encouraged that you, as a parent are taking the time to read this article. Paintball can be played safely, and in my experiences traveling North America to attend paintball tournaments and big games with thousands of people on the fields, accidents and serious injuries have been very few and far between. Keeping paintball safe depends on the players, and for the younger players it depends on you, their parents looking out for them, and making sure that both you, and they are educated in the keys to safe paintball play. The parent who absentmindedly buys their child a paintball gun and leaves them unsupervised to do with it as they will is one of the greatest dangers facing our sport today. On the other hand the parent who takes the time for education, and supervision is on the road to expanding their relationship with their child, supporting them in an exciting activity, and sometimes even joining them in one of the world’s most enjoyable sports.

The Sport
The game is played by as few as two people playing one on one to as many as several thousand playing on one field. You can play in the woods or specialized paintball fields.

Paintball started out in the woods. I started playing about 15 years ago with pump action Splat gun made of plastic playing in the woods. When playing in the woods you must remember how far a paintball can travel. Most paintballs will burst when fired through thin braches or even thick underbrush but you should take precautions that houses or traffic are not in range of your game. Never play on property that is not yours unless you have permission of the owner. This is called Outlaw Paintball. You could get trespassing, destruction of property, or even the unlawful discharge of a weapon (depending on where you live) charges against you. Outlaw paintball is dangerous for property owners as they may be struck with stray balls or have their property temporarily marred by paintballs. It can also be dangerous to the outlaws. A player could fall and get hurt in unfamiliar grounds without someone being able to find them.

Modern day paintball in the woods is often referred to as woodsball. Many fields around the country have large woodsball fields. They are great places to play a scenario game or a war based game. The nicer fields clear much of the undergrowth to make the game less of a battle against the trees. Any number of players can be playing woodsball at a time and is usually played at a slower, more strategic pace as players find cover in trees and plan moves to get better angles on opponents.

Arena style play started out in the late 80's and early 90's. These are usually smaller fields surrounded by protective netting to catch stray paintballs. They could have manmade structures like large wooden spools or inflatable bunkers. There are many variations of this type of game including speedball and xball. These games are usually played at a much faster pace than woodsball. These games are usually played by 3, 5, 7, and 10 man teams. Many cities have indoor speedball fields that can be enjoyed year round.

You can also play rec style paintball, which is usually played in more open areas than arena style. There could be natural or manmade structures and bunkers around the field to provide cover. These games can be played by small groups up or could fill the field with thousands of players running a re-enactment game.

There are several hundred fields around the country to be played on. They can be very affordable to almost expensive. I would encourage you to look around the field before deciding to pay to play. Ask to watch a game from the sidelines (make sure you are wearing your mask because you are in the line of fire). See if they clear obstacles from the field. Check to see if the referees are alert and actively policing the game to keep people safe. Many fields offer rental equipment so be sure that the airsmith shows you how to safety the marker and operate it properly before getting on the field. Most fields will train new comers on the rules of the game but if they don't offer and you don't know, ask. Never be afraid to ask questions at a field. Remember, you are paying to be there and the staff is there to help.

Life Lessons
I will tell you that this sport has given me a more confident, honest, and thoughtful son than I had a year ago. Paintball allows him to think on his feet while interacting with others. If he makes a strategic mistake he will quickly know as he gets marked. He gets the trill of victory when he pulls a flag playing speedball or marking an opponent before he gets marked himself. He is learning sportsmanship in being honest when he gets marked and doesn't try to hide it. Walking off the field he is planning on how to do better not trash talking the other team.

In a large rec game my son and I may be playing with over a hundred strangers and to see my son follow the flow of the game and interact with confidence with adults and other children means a lot to a growing child. He has learned to quickly follow commands and to think quickly when he needs to make the decision to press, fall back, or fire.

Those are the lessons that carry you through to adulthood.

For me, my experiences are more of the thrill type. How quick I can make my move or how well I can plan my player's moves before a speedball match. This game exercises my mind and my body.

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:01 am

What is Paintball?
Paintball is a challenging and sophisticated combination of the childhood games "tag" and "hide & seek". Groups divide into two teams to play "capture the flag". The object of the game is to capture the opposing team's flag while protecting your own. While trying to capture the flag, you also try to eliminate opposing players by tagging them with a paintball expelled from a special air gun called a "paint gun". Games have a time limit of 20 to 30 minutes allowing you to play several games during your session.
A paintball is a round, thin-skinned gelatin capsule with a colored, non-toxic, water-soluble paint inside. It rinses out of clothing and off skin with soap and water. When a paintball tags a player the thin gelatin skin splits open and the liquid inside leaves a bright "paint" splat. A player who is marked is eliminated from the game.
For safety, paintball players must always wear approved for paintball goggles to protect their eyes during a game and while in other areas where shooting is permitted. Paintball is a very safe sport as long as safety rules are followed. Referees on the field start and stop games, enforce the rules of safe play, and control the sport's safety.
Paintball is physically challenging. As with any sport, if you have doubts about your physical condition and ability to participate please consult your physician. Proper clothing is essential. Long sleeve shirts and pants are a must (no shorts please). Sturdy shoes with ankle support are recommended as are groin protection for men and chest protection for women. Camouflage clothing will help you blend in with the surroundings (Stalker Paintball Games has camouflage available to rent).
Paintball is a sport played by people from all professions and life styles. It is a sport where women and men compete equally and where age is not dominated by youth. Physical size and strength are not as important as intelligence and determination. Like a game of chess, being able to think quickly and decisively is what makes you a star. Paintball also is a character-building sport. Players learn the importance of teamwork and gain self-confidence while developing leadership abilities.
Paintball is an exciting sport and above all, paintball is fun! It's a chance to shake off your day to day responsibilities and rekindle your spirit of adventure. Once the adrenaline starts pumping, you can't help but love the thrill of the game!

Ok, wow that is long... sry about the length, but I think it's necessary. plz post comments and any questions you may have.

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:11 am

ok. Why did you not just post the link?

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:55 am

I read it all. I think I will show this to my parents as well as Val showing his. I learned some better excuses. I totally forgot about Christmas! Though my dad hates giving presents. He usually brings us somewhere nice and gives us a few things. Bleh, I don't care where I am essentially, more what I'm doing (activities). I think if I showed my parents this, they would change their opinions. I don't know about you guys though. I don't want to go into this alone. I think everyone should show their parents this. Plus, if my parents start to like it, you may have an excuse or my parents can talk to yours or something. I don't know, still have to show them, but I think they will like it. Especially my dad, he might volunteer as a ref sometime or something. He would have played with us on my birthday if he remembered to get a mothers day gift before that. So I'm hoping my parents like it. I know they've spent more than $600 on hockey stuff for me, so this could be a next possible sport opportunity. I think they'll like it, but lets wait and see...

YAH!!!!!!!!!!!! My mom likes it now! At first she thought it was barbaric, then I showed her some stuff. I showed her all the safety stuff and gear in general. She was surprised that it was this popular. She didn't know people buy markers! I told her that it wasn't really like war because you don't hate the other side, it's just like tag. She changed her mind about a lot of things once I associated it with tag. I told her about capture the flag and everything and she thought it sounded fun. I haven't spoken to my dad yet but my mom says my dad and his buddies (that do crazy stuff together [go on ski trips, motorcycle, dirtbike/atv, travel...etc]) should go with us sometime. I was like, YES! My dad would have fun with his buddies. So it looks like I'm set, but I don't want to do this alone, so, I can't really say "GET SET!" nicely. I got lucky though. But my parents don't want me to focus too much on it, they want me to be involved with other sports as well (soccer, and hockey in winter with friends). Still have to get a job though...
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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Wed Jul 09, 2008 1:49 pm

lucky for you Jeff, my dad says that the colerful paint and the "markers" are just a way to hid that it is like war.... Evil or Very Mad wrong... oh so wrong... and my mom... won't hear anything i have to say!!!

and christian, that was stuff from a lot more than one site, more like a dozen at least.

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Thu Jul 10, 2008 10:12 pm

Ya my parents are kinda like NO VIOLENCE *smack*

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Fri Jul 11, 2008 5:35 am

yeah, like your dad, lol...

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Fri Jul 11, 2008 1:18 pm

Off topic but.... Val are you using your moms computer or something from france?

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Sat Jul 12, 2008 8:03 am

you could have pm'd me but ok, I'm using my grandpa's computer but it kinda sucks cuz that means I can't spend more than 45min on the computer at any given time. and usually only once per day... Mad makes me kinda mad...

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:23 pm

Lol, I remember when we played stick rpg....That game annoys me now, because you can't really do anything.

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PostSubject: Re: Parent ifon.   Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:45 am

yeah, now it's fun for the first...oh, 10min.

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